Skip to main content

Three Utah projects receive IOTI funding to improve disability training

JoLynne Lyon

08/28/2019

View as a pdf

A sad girl sits with arms around her knees
Less adult support is correlated with risky behavior at higher rates than those youth that have supportive adults. Youth with disabilities are especially vulnerable, and they need support at a much higher level in order for them
to thrive as healthy adolescents.

The CPD awarded Interagency Outreach and Training Initiative funding to three organizations this summer, to address disability training in Utah over a period of three years.

IOTI is a collaborative effort between Utah State University's Center for Persons with Disabilities and the Utah Coordinating Council for Persons with Disabilities.

These new projects should provide targeted training in the area of developmental disability and mental illness; help youth with disabilities find supportive adults in their lives; and train both autistic job seekers and the companies that hire them on strategies for employment.

Watch for these initiatives in Utah!

 

TKJ addresses mental health training

TKJ will train paraprofessionals, professionals, individuals, and family members of people with a dual diagnosis of developmental disability and mental health needs. They will use evidence-based materials, offer onsite trainings and ensure sustainability in both the training and the materials used, beyond the grant period.

A significant percentage of individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities are also living with a mental health diagnosis. Identifying the signs, symptoms and appropriate treatment options for this population requires specialized training and support for both professionals and caregivers. Many practitioners feel unprepared to serve this complex population.

This training is meant to address that need, and it will be completed across the state of Utah, including underserved rural areas, by master’s level trainers. 

Utah Department of Health targets supportive adults

Professional development and parent education will be provided, with the goal of helping youth with disabilities find supportive adults in their lives.

Less adult support is correlated with risky behavior at higher rates than those youth that have supportive adults. Youth with disabilities are especially vulnerable, and they need support at a much higher level in order for them to thrive as healthy adolescents.

The Utah Department of Health aims to increase the ability of parents and paraprofessionals to effectively support youth with disabilities by helping school paraprofessionals and parents build social emotional learning skills, increase positive adult-teen communication, and strengthen relationships with young people, ages 10-19, that currently have an Individualized Education Plan. 

Based on demographic information, the UDOH selected five high-need regions to participate in the project: Salt Lake, the Uintah Basin, San Juan, Ogden, and Southeastern Utah.

Autism Employment Training Program

Workshops for autistic individuals and employers will be conducted throughout the state of Utah. These will not only identify strengths and needs, but also share strategies from autistic peers who are employed.

Individuals can learn from their peers. An employer component will train personnel from companies in hiring and working with autistic employees and provide professional development throughout Utah.

Both the individual and employer components will include an insider perspective from an experienced autistic trainer and a neurotypical adult.

Share This Story